volcano

Remineralization

Noun: (re·min·er·al·iza·tion)

-The restoring of minerals to de-mineralized structures or substances. Trace elements are contained in rock dusts. Soil microbes convert these minerals into elemental forms that are available to plants.

Remineralization of soils is a natural reoccurring process that nature does on a global scale. It is the replacing of minerals in depleted soil through the application of finely ground rocks. Nature uses two types of rock dusts to remineralize the land. However, nature carries out the process on a massive and sometimes violent scale. On May 18, 1980, Mount St. Helens erupted and sent ash skyward. That ash plume deposited fine ash particles over millions of acres of forest and farmland. While crops were devastated the first year, subsequent years saw substantial crop improvements as the new source of nutrients from volcanic rock dust was exploited by living organisms.

During the last ice age massive glaciers ground underlying rocks into a fine dust called rock flour. As glaciers retreated and the dust was released winds carried it aloft. It eventually settled back to earth providing a fresh layer of minerals to nurture future plant growth. In some areas the dust settled hundreds of feet thick and later became known as loess soil deposits, some of the richest soils in the world.

When you add rock dust to your garden or put it in your potting soil you take on the role of the volcanoes and glaciers, and in a controlled fashion remineralize the soil. The event may be smaller but the results can be amazing.
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Basalt

Basalt

Gypsum

Gypsum

Glacial Rock Dust

Glacial Rock Dust

Olivine

Olivine

Phosphate

Phosphate

Garden Limestone

Garden Limestone

Azomite

Azomite

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